English

Science Interpreter Training Program
@ The University of Tokyo

Welcome

Science in Society : Thoughts about the logo

logo_enThe logo of our program is based on the ginkgo leaves of logo of the University of Tokyo. It was created by portraying the edge of ginkgo leaf as the alphabet “S,” letting the two letters “S” come close, overlap, and harmonize mutually. The letters “S” stand for “Science” and “Society”.

 

Concept

We, who live in modern world, benefit from science and technology in every aspects of daily life. None the less, the psychological distance between us and science/ technology that are becoming increasingly complex continues to increase. This leads people to become less interested in science. If current situation continues, relations between science/technology and society will deteriorate resulting in unhappy consequences.

Thus, the Science Interpreter Training Program was established in our university. This program is designed for graduate students from all over the campuses, regardless of their major study areas. We encourage students to have their own specialty areas, and then additionally learn relationship between science and society rather than confining themselves to their own specialized areas. A cross-cutting curriculum is offered to master varied and critical ways of thinking and broaden the horizon, by cooperating with famous instructors within and off-campus, and by setting discussion time among graduate students of varied backgrounds.

We plan to nurture science/engineer majors with broader background and social literacy, humanities majors who can search for common ground with science and technology from political, economical, and philosophical standpoints, and human resources who activate interactive communication between science/technology and society. Thus, we believe what we plan to achieve in this program is one of the important missions of the University of Tokyo.

Since this is a minor curriculum, students and instructors naturally have to make an extra effort. But what they learn and experience throughout this program shall provide a foundation for them to play an active role as leaders in many years to come in building better relationships between science and society.

Key Features

What to Communicate, How to Communicate

The SITP program focuses not only on ‘How to Communicate’ in science interpretation but also on ‘What in science and technology to be communicated.’ Considering ‘what to communicate’ requires abilities to understand and interpret science information, for example, how data are composed and what data indicate.  The SITP develops human resources who are well-equipped with solid scientific knowledge and scientific ways of thinking as well as good understanding of ethical and social aspects of science and technology.

 

Highly-Concentrated, Small-Group Education

The SITP accepts approximately 10 students every year.  The size of class is rather small, in order to provide good mentoring and to foster good quality of discussions in class.  The SITP expects each student, after completion of the program, plays critical roles in the various field of the society, as a catalyst who disseminates sprits and skills of science interpretation.

 

Minor Program for Graduate Students that is completed for 1 year and half

The SITP is a graduate minor program, as the program aims to train students who build their own expertise in their major studies.  The curriculum begins in the winter term and is completed in a year and half (shortest).  Students who complete required curriculum receive a certificate of completion of the SITP by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

 

Theory and Practices: In and Outside the Class

The program combines courses in theory and practices.  The program offers lectures and seminars by distinguished instructors on- and off-campus.  The SITP also provides opportunities for field trips to research facilities, visit to science museums, and to production site of TV programs.

Students’ Profile

The SITP accepts students with a wide variety of major studies.

The SITP graduates play leading role in a wide range of fields, including research and development, science and technology policy, education, and journalism.

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Curriculum

This was established as a campus-wide minor program for graduate students, regardless of whether they are science majors or humanities majors, in order to develop human resources who can raise problems that can be caused by science in society and who can suggest right directions, instead of only conducting awareness campaigns for science and technology, and to have such human resources play an active and core role in various scenes of society. The program attaches importance to cross-cutting activities, such as lectures and seminars by various instructors who are gathered from all over the campus, field trips to research facilities, and discussions among students in different fields of study. The curriculum begins in the winter term and is completed in a year and half. If required units are obtained during this time, a certificate of completion of the curriculum is offered by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

What to Communicate, How to Communicate

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Staff

Faculty

  • HIRONO Yoshiyuki (Program Director) – Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • HASEGAWA Toshikazu – Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • WATANABE Yuichiro – Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • FUJIGAKI Yuko – Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • OSHIMA Mari – Professor, Institute of Industrial Science/
    Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies
  • SAKURA Osamu – Professor, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies
  • OKAMOTO Takuji – Associate Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • ISHIHARA Koji – Associate Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • MATSUDA Yasuyuki – Associate Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • TOYOTA Taro – Associate Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • KAWAGOE Shio – Lecturer, Institute of Industrial Science
  • SON Daisuke – Lecturer, Graduate School of Medicine
  • TORII Hiroyuki – Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
  • EMA Arisa – Project Assistant Professor
  • MIKAMI Koichi – Project Assistant Professor

Cooperating Instructors within the Campus

  • KO Tsuneo – Appointed Professor, The University Museum

Part-time Lecturer

  • KURODA Reiko – Professor, Tokyo University of Science
  • MATSUMOTO Mayumi – International Environment and Economy Institute
  • KIRA Takayuki – Lecturer, Utsunomiya Kyowa University
  • NAKAMURA Masaki – Associate Professor, Osaka University
  • OSHIDA Ren – Iwanami Shoten
  • SARASHINA Isao – The University Museum

Contact

Science Interpreter Training Program
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Komaba)

Advanced Research Laboratory 409 (4th floor), University of Tokyo Komaba Campus
3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8902, Japan

Phone & Fax:+81-3-5465-8828
E-mail:info[at]science-interpreter.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp ([at]→@)

Map

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